Social Revolution

A speculative installation exploring how rethinking architecture could help tackle the loneliness epidemic. 

An interactive installation, visitors navigate different environments created by objects turning on a series of rotating plates

An interactive installation, visitors navigate different environments created by objects turning on a series of rotating plates

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You see we can feed the stomach with concentrates. We can supply microfilm for reading, recreation, even movies of a sort. We can pump oxygen in and waste material out, but there’s one thing we can’t simulate. That’s a very basic need. Man’s hunger for companionship. The barrier of loneliness. That’s one thing we haven’t licked yet.
— The Twilight Zone (Serling & Stevens, 1959) 

EXHIBITION / PUBLIC SPACE / MENTAL HEALTH

Speculative / 2018

Cities are getting larger, people are living in closer proximity, disposable income is increasing and digital networks offer new ways to keep us connected. So why are we so lonely? 

Could cities be designed to break the cycle of perceived isolation? Can we design belonging in and loneliness out? Can cities themselves be part of the cure? 

Social Revolution is a radical investigation into architecture and loneliness. Three large plates rotate slowly within a larger accessible platform. Objects and structures come together and move apart. Private spaces slowly become public, solo visitors find themselves part of a group. The shifting surfaces force us to interact and to find common ground. Can we remain isolated if connections literally come to us? 

Designed around a conventional grid, and in its use of volume and section, the installation is pure architecture – with all stuffiness removed. It makes and breaks structural and social connections, and challenges assumptions about what is comfortable.

A testbed for human connection rather than a prototype for the public realm, Social Revolution suggests a new language of design to foster connections and wellbeing. We believe that in order to create healthy cities it’s time for a radical rethink of the urban experience; to move away from development driven by economic growth towards a salutogenic model that acknowledges the significance of the built environment on our mental health, and suggests new ways of designing for a healthy society. 

Take a spin in the Social Revolution, it will turn your loneliness around. 

 

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